Share:

SugarScience Alerts

October 28, 2019

Sugary Drink Ban Tied to Health Improvements at UCSF Medical Center

A workplace ban on the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages led to a 48.5 percent average reduction in their consumption and significantly less belly fat among 202 participants in a study by researchers at the UC San Francisco. Elissa Epel, PhD, lead author of the 10-month study that looked at positive health effects associated with reducing sugary beverages intake.

Read Article

October 8, 2019

U.S. obesity as delayed effect of excess sugar

In the last century, U.S. diets were transformed, including the addition of sugars to industrially-processed foods. While excess sugar has often been implicated in the dramatic increase in U.S. adult obesity over the past 30 years, an unexplained question is why the increase in obesity took place many years after the increases in U.S. sugar consumption.

Read Article

October 8, 2019

Calculating the Risk of type 2 diabetes by consuming Sugary Beverages

Evaluating the the associations of long-term changes in consumption of sugary beverages (including sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices) and artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) with subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes.

Read Article

August 7, 2019

First Strict Test Shows Why a Junk Food Diet Packs on Weight

Harried humans around the world are embracing cheap, ultra-processed foods such as white bread, bacon and hash browns. But the first randomized controlled trial on the health effects of these foods shows that people offered such a diet ingest more calories — and pack on more weight — than they do when presented with more wholesome meals.

Read Article

March 14, 2019

Tobacco companies hook kids on sugary drinks

Tobacco conglomerates that used colors, flavors and marketing techniques to entice children as future smokers transferred these same strategies to sweetened beverages when they bought food and drinks companies starting in 1963. The study by researchers at UC San Francisco, which draws from a cache of previously secret documents from the tobacco industry that is part of the UCSF Industry Documents Library, tracked the acquisition and subsequent marketing campaigns of sweetened drink brands by two leading tobacco companies and found that as tobacco was facing increased scrutiny from health authorities, its executives transferred the same products and tactics to peddle soft drinks.

Read Article

January 4, 2019

Sugar’s Sick Secrets: How Industry Forces Have Manipulated Science to Downplay the Harm

Why is our food saturated with all these sweeteners? When did they make their way into our yogurt, cereal, and oatmeal? How did they sneak into our salad dressing, soup, bread, lunch meat, pasta sauce, and pretzels? And, most crucially, what forces are responsible for this deluge, which is making some of us very sick? UCSF scientists are uncovering the answers to those questions.

Read Article

September 24, 2018

Unveiling UCSF's New Food Industry Documents Archive

The UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and the UCSF Industry Documents Library are excited to announce the public launching of the New Food Industry Documents Archive. The event, held on November 15, 2018, featured a stellar lineup of speakers. For details of the symposium click the link below.

Read Article

March 13, 2018

How to Stop Eating Sugar

If you live in the United States, you probably eat more sugar than is good for you. It’s probably not your fault, either. Added sweeteners are infused into a shocking number of foods. To help you give up the cravings for sugar, David Leonhardt, New York Times Op-Ed Columnist, has written a guide that was published in the New York Times.

Read Article

February 15, 2018

Using Art to Tackle Obesity and Diabetes in Youth

Between 2000 and 2009, the rate of Type 2 diabetes in children jumped more than 30 percent — and it is climbing especially fast among children from poor and minority families. Faced with these startling numbers, public health experts and arts educators have teamed up to try a novel approach to preventing the disease in young people.

Read Article

January 27, 2018

How neighborhoods shape life with diabetes

People with diabetes who live in poor communities with limited access to exercise facilities or grocery stores may have a harder time managing their symptoms than diabetics living in more affluent areas, a U.S. study suggests. A patient takes a blood glucose test during an event aimed to help people with diabetes to cope with their illness at Saint Luka diagnostics medical center in Sofia, November 13, 2012. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov Communities with lower employment, income and education that have scant resources to support exercise and healthy eating have long been linked to an increased risk of developing diabetes. For the current study, however, researchers focused on 15,308 patients who already had diabetes to see if their neighborhoods might impact how well they lived with the disease.

Read Article
Showing 1 - 10 of 10 Articles
< Previous 1 Next >

SugarScience Facts

Growing scientific evidence shows that too much added sugar, over time, is linked to diabetes, heart disease and liver disease.

SugarScience Facts

Overconsumption of added sugar is linked to type 2 diabetes, a disease affecting 26 million Americans.

Healthy Beverage Initiative
Toolkit

Learn more about how organizations are
eliminating the sale of sugar sweetened beverages.

Learn more

Recent Blog Entries

SugarScience Blog Archive